FOUR QUARTERS WITH CANDY APPLES

These are somewhat quieter afternoons than those spent in recent months.

Before on the blog it was all so immediate, straightforward and sincere. I was opening this editor. I ticked emotions, days and memories as if I were racing on a descent. Very quickly I jumped off without fear that there was a cliff at the end of the road, a small stick capable of making me fall or a carelessness that would have thrown me face down on the asphalt. I was sure. So sure that the race was starting and at the end there was always a beautiful view. Once the snow, a stormy sea. The other still a flower garden and so on with a huge change of scripts all incredibly colorful, fragrant and varied. To take your breath away.

Now I’m no longer racing downhill but armored in a car. I constantly make sure I press the brake. I keep my seat belt tight and I am proud to have the double airbag. To look out the window carefully imagining sudden sleepers and consequently unexpected surprises. The handbrake is always in sight and a small map on the seat with a marked route but with the uncontrollable desire to steer and not follow it.

And it is precisely this desire that makes me understand that I can heal. That I can go back to running down the slope and stop getting into tanks for fear of getting hurt. I have always driven as in the descent (but I have always worn the belts) and never as well as in this metaphor. I’ve always been safe in the car. A bit reckless and arrogant but more in the twenty years, come on. A little bit of all of the rest. So who is this that controls the crossbeams and tries to read the maps instead of following the invincible sense of direction? Who is this that doesn’t imagine at the end of the road an incredible cliff at Thelma & Louise where you can accelerate hard and laugh out loud on the flying clouds? Always me. But she is a me that I don’t particularly like.

But I like the fact that you continue to choose simple and good sweets and that now I can even taste them. Incredible, isn’t it? Today I want to talk to you – as well as about cars and cliffs – about this delicious four-quarter with caramelized apples. I think it’s a Donna Hay recipe but I’m not sure. I marked it on the notes of the iPhone but stupidly I did not write the author, sorry. Visually, however, I remember the photo and I would swear it was by Donna Hay. It looks like a kind of tarte tatin because the apples stay at the bottom just like they do in the tatin. But not evenly despite being meticulously cut. And so it’s a bit wrong. Imperfect in her majestic beauty.

And I like flawed and crooked cakes. Because one day they straighten up. Others don’t. A bit like us. What does this four quarters teach me today? That the essence is always the really important thing. And that some changes happen just to remind us.
RECIPE
For 4-6 people

The four quarters:

250 grams of sugar
250 grams of soft butter at room temperature
250 grams of flour
4 eggs
vanilla or cinnamon (as you prefer)
For the caramelized apples:

3 apples (around 250-300 grams no more)
One lemon
150 grams of sugar
30 grams of butter
Clean the apples thoroughly and peel them. Cut them into cubes as regular as possible. Sprinkle with lemon juice. Melt the butter in a saucepan over very low heat. Put the apples and turn up the heat, letting them cook for five minutes. Separately, make the caramel with the sugar (150 grams) and a little water. When it is still light and not completely caramelized, or when it reaches a boil (shortly after), pour it over the apples with the butter. Turn well and set aside.

Now work the butter and sugar together and then add the eggs one by one. Beat well and make sure that each egg is blended before adding the other. Now add the sifted flour and pour into the greased and floured mold. Only when you have poured the mixture sink the apple cubes into it and cook at 180 already hot for at least 45 minutes. It will look like a kind of Tarte Tatin and the base will be very soft. I advise you to sink the apple cubes well.

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